Potato and Turnip Mash with Wild Garlic

Time Preparing: 10 mins
Time Cooking: 20 mins
Serves: 2
Difficulty: 1/5
Season: Winter

Ingredients:
– 500g Potatoes
– 200g Turnips
– Salt and Pepper, for seasoning
– 3-4 Wild Garlic Leaves
– 2tbsp Cream or Soya alternative

Method:
1. Peel the turnips and potatoes, then cut into small chunks
2. Boil or steam for twenty mins – until tender
3. Finely chop wild garlic
4. Mash turnips and potatoes, add seasoning, cream and wild garlic

 

 

This recipe was created for Tower Green Hamlets by Pauline Cuisine

Oh my, sweet potato pie

Next week is national Pie Week. Only in the UK would you have a week dedicated to celebrating the wonder that are pies!

We’ve really done our research on pies this week and have discovered that pies date all the way back to the Roman period. Originally the pastry was used to store the meat, or whatever other filling was inside, similar to how we’d use a pot nowadays. The pastry, which was fairly inedible back then, would be used to hold the meal together whilst it was cooked. It was only over time that the pastry could be included in the meal too.

Below is a great pie recipe that incorporates many of the ingredients from this weeks boxes:

Chicken, leek and mushroom pie with cauliflower mash topping

Ingredients

For the pie filling:
1 tsp ghee
2 leeks, trimmed, sliced
2 large celery stalks, trimmed, diced
1 bay leaf
500ml hot chicken stock
4 carrots, sliced
1 small fennel bulb, outer leaves removed
250g mushrooms, sliced
600g cooked chicken
large handful chopped parsley
salt and pepper
For the pie topping:
1.2kg cauliflower, outer leaves removed
4 garlic cloves, peeled and left whole
50g butter
salt and pepper

Method
1. Preheat the oven to 220C/200C Fan/Gas 7.
2. Heat the ghee in a frying pan over a medium heat. Add the leeks and fry for 4-5 minutes, or until softened but not browned. Add the celery and bay leaf and increase the heat to high. Fry for 1-2 minutes.
3. Add the chicken stock to the pan and bring to the boil, then add the carrots, fennel and mushrooms and reduce the heat until the mixture is simmering. Continue to simmer the mixture until the volume of liquid has reduced and thickened, and the vegetables are tender, about 12-15 minutes.
4. Meanwhile, for the topping, put the cauliflower, garlic cloves and half of the butter in a large, lidded saucepan. Add 4 tablespoons of water and cover.
5. Bring the pan contents to a simmer over a medium heat and steam for 6-8 minutes, or until the cauliflower is tender when pierced with a knife (add a splash more water during cooking if necessary). Remove from the heat and transfer the contents to a food processor. Blend to your consistency of choice – either smooth and creamy or roughly textured. Season with salt and pepper.
6. To finish the pie filling, remove the bay leaf and add the remaining filling ingredients to the pan. Season with salt and pepper. Stir well, then transfer the mixture to an ovenproof pie dish.
7. Spoon the pie topping over the filling and spread into an even layer using a palette knife. Use a fork to create a criss-cross pattern on top of the filling. Dot the top of the pie with the remaining butter.
8. Bake for 25-30 minutes, or until the filling is bubbling and the topping is golden-brown.

For more ideas on how to eat the vegetables in this week’s box, try searching on our webpage for past blogs!


This Week’s Bounty

All Boxes
Potatoes, Lancs
Cauliflower, Lancs
Flower Sprouts, Lincs
Kale, Perry Court
Winter Pulsane, Perry Court
Leeks, Cambs

Medium & Large Boxes
Mushrooms, Suffolk
Wild Garlic, Kent
Kohl Rabi, Lancs

Large Boxes
Beetroot, Lancs



Fruit Supplement
Apples, Kent (All Boxes)
Pears, Kent (Medium & Large Boxes)
Blood Oranges, ESP (Large Boxes)

Spring Delights

Hope you are enjoying the much awaited warmer weather! And we have a delightful box with lots of variety including artichoke, golden beetroot, wild garlic, mustard leaf & grapefruit.

Wild garlic really doesn’t last long and if you want more there are still some in the ancient woodlands of the Tower Hamlets Cemetery Park waiting to be foraged. So why not make this wild garlic pesto to make it last longer?

Wild garlic also goes hand-in-hand with bluebells so now is the time to visit the Cemetery Park to see the vast array of bluebells. Look closely and you may even spot the truly delightful pink and white varieties!

And whilst we are talking about foraging, why not sign up for the Wild Food session on 21 May or Edible Trees session on 31 May? It is part of this year’s Chelsea Fringe: explore the new ‘Plants and People’ trail at the cemetery park which explores the relationships between plants and people. Lots of other events are also on offer, so check out their Facebook page and like it!

For the other items in your box, why not try Jewish-Roman styled fried artichoke? Very very easy, the artichokes are quickly fried so they become crispy and nutty, while the tasty hearts become tender and earthy.

We also have the highly nutritious mustard greens this week, whose peppery flavour add a wonderful dimension to many dishes. The smaller, more tender leaves of spring will generally be milder in flavour than the mature leaves later in the season.

If you don’t find the flavour of the raw leaves too strong, try adding a small amount to a salad for a lively, peppery accent. To tame the bitterness, use a combination of heat, salt, and fat. Try it lightly wilted, blanched, or sautéd to retain the bright colour and texture. Alternatively boil or braise longer to soften the flavour further. Ingredients that help balance the bitterness include salt, soy sauce, bacon, prosciutto, toasted nuts, olive oil, or sesame oil. Check out this spotlight on mustard greens with many recipes to try or you can’t go wrong with this Italian sausage and mustard green,

For more ideas on how to eat the vegetables in this week’s box, try searching on our webpage for past blogs!

This Week’s Bounty

Standard Box
* Valour Potatoes, Perry Court
* Leek Bunch, Perry Court
* Parsnips, Yorks
* Golden Beets, Yorks
* Swede, Yorks
Artichokes, Spain
Mustard Leaf, Perry Court
Wild Garlic, UK

No-Potato Substitute
Carrots, Yorks

Fruit Supplement
Bananas, Dom Rep
* Grapefruit, Spain

Small Box
Items starred (*) above

Wild Garlic is Back!

It’s that time of the year when wild garlic makes an appearance in our native English woodlands. As with all things seasonal, make the most of them as the season is rather short. Identifiable by its long, lush leaves and little white flowers (later in the season, note that they are perfectly edible) and underpinned by its garlic aroma, they looks and taste a little like giant chives. The sight of wild garlic on a woodland walk, especially when the pretty flowers appear, is as delightful as wandering through carpets of bluebell (haven’t seen these yet have you?!?) even if sometimes accompanied by a pungent smell!

Unlike the common cultivated garlic, it’s the leaves that are eaten rather than the bulbs. The taste is more delicate too and can be eaten raw or lightly cooked. Quickly blanched or wilted in olive oil they make a delicately garlicky alternative to spinach.

Wild garlic can also be stirred into soothing spring risotto or two (with peas or enriched with creamy crumbled goats cheese), folded into an omelette or woven into a plate of buttery scrambled eggs. Add it to your bacon and spaghetti, or to your sausages and fusili. Make a soup or pesto of out it (maybe try this hazelnut version instead of the more usual pine nut base).

Or use it in sauces to accompany meat and fish – try this garlicky sauce with pan-fried salmon and spring onion mash or make some wild garlic and chilli sauce for tossing into a quick pasta or as a straight sauce or dressing for grilled fish that needs a bit of zing. And our favourite for the week is this delightful lime green wild garlic mayo to go with everything.

If you can’t get enough of wild garlic, try foraging for it in our very own Tower Hamlets Cemetery Park patch of woods, which we wrote about a blog post from our archives – check it out!

For more ideas on how to eat the vegetables in this week’s box, try searching on our webpage for past blogs!

This Week’s Bounty

Standard Box
* Valour Potatoes, Perry Court
* Bunched Leeks, Perry Court
* Parsnips, Various
* Golden Beetroot, Lancs
* Wild Garlic, TBC
Pak Choy, Kent
(or Kale if not available)
White Mushrooms, Suffolk

Small Box
Items starred (*) above

No-Potato Substitute
Swede, Yorks

Fruit Supplement
Clementines, Spain (standard only)
Jonagold Apples, Kent

 

It’s Officially Summer!

Notwithstanding the chilly temperatures some hours, the patches of sunshine brings hope whilst 1st of May tells us that summer is indeed here. So we’ve got mixed salad and radishes in the boxes as a fitting herald to the new season.

If you’ve still got parsley from last week and wondering what to do with it, why not try this green parsley risotto with sauteed shrimps. Substitute the shrimps with snails (sorry we don’t source those but there are sure to be quite a few lurking around Stepney City Farm) and you’ve got Heston’s Fat Duck snail porridge, which is basically a parsley risotto with snails – a solid French dish taken to a new level. And here’s a fancier snail porridge recipe if you are really scratching around for something to do this May Bank holiday instead of practicing your Morris dancing around a may pole or meandering amongst bluebells and wild garlic.

As for your wild garlic (check out our suggestions from our last write-up on it) and some of the other items in your box why not try:

For more ideas on how to eat the vegetables in this week’s box, try searching on our webpage for past blogs!

This Week’s Bounty

Standard Box

* Charlotte Potatoes, Lincs

* Carrots, Scotland
* Chestnut Mushrooms, Suffolk
* Wild Garlic, Kent
Kale, Kent
Radish, Kent
Mixed Salad, Perry Court
Rhubarb, Lancs

Small Box
Items starred (*) above
+ Broccoli, Spain

No-Potato Substitute
Leek, Kent

Fruit Supplement
Mandarins, Spain (standard only)
Bananas, Dom Rep

 

Springing Some Wild Garlic

It’s that time of the year when wild garlic makes an appearance in our native English woodlands. As with all things seasonal, make the most of them as the season is rather short. Identifiable by its long, lush leaves and little white flowers (later in the season, note that they are perfectly edible) and underpinned by its garlic aroma, they looks and taste a little like giant chives. The sight of wild garlic on a woodland walk, especially when the pretty flowers appear, is as delightful as wandering through carpets of bluebell, even if sometimes accompanied by a pungent smell!

Unlike the common cultivated garlic, it’s the leaves that are eaten rather than the bulbs. The taste is more delicate too and can be eaten raw or lightly cooked. Quickly blanched or wilted in olive oil they make a delicately garlicky alternative to spinach. Wild garlic can also be stirred into soothing spring risottos, folded into an omelette or woven into a plate of buttery scrambled eggs. Make a soup or pesto of out it. Or use it in sauces to accompany meat and fish – try this garlicky sauce with pan-fried salmon and spring onion mash. Add it to your bacon and spaghetti, or to your sausages and fusili.

If you can’t get enough of wild garlic, try foraging for it in our very own Tower Hamlets Cemetery Park patch of woods, which we wrote about a blog post last year – check it out!

For more ideas on how to eat the vegetables in this week’s box, try searching on our webpage for past blogs!

This Week’s Bounty

Standard Box
* Valour Potatoes, UK
* Onions, Norfolk
* Jerusalem Artichokes, Perry Court
* Wild Garlic, Kent
Spring Greens, Yorks
Mustard Leaves, Perry Court
Confection Squash, Cambs
Carrots, Lancs
Small Box
Items starred (*) above
+ Purple Sprouting Broccoli, Yorks

No-Potato Substitute
Chioggia Beetroot, Lancs

Fruit Supplement
Apples – Gala, Kent (standard only)
Blood Oranges, Spain

 

Foraging for wild garlic

Rather than wait for wild garlic from Cornwall or Kent to show up in my veg bag, we decided to go foraging for some at the Tower Hamlets Cemetery Park. All thanks to the ever so personable Ken Greenway who took us on a spring bulbs walking tour at the cemetery park and pointed out where this patch of big succulent wild garlic (as well as the thinner wild chives) are located.

WildGarlic WildChives

Since bluebells have decided to make an early appearances it makes the harvesting even more atmospheric and worthwhile, alongside the flowering wild garlic and chives (it wasn’t flowering the last time we saw it but of course that was at the end of February).

BluebellsinBackground

We ended up with 100g which is probably double what you would get in the veg bag anyway. Ahhh, the joys of Tower “Green” Hamlets!