Mushroom and Walnut Pasta with Sprouts Top Pesto

Time Preparing: 5 mins
Time Cooking:  15 mins
Serves: 2
Difficulty: 2/5
Season: Winter

Ingredients:
– 120g Pasta
– 120g Mushrooms
– 1 Onion
– 100g Homemade Brussels Sprout Top Pesto
– 40g Walnuts
– 1tbsp Olive Oil
– Salt and Pepper, for seasoning

Method:
1. Start by cooking the pasta as instructed on the packaging
2. Peel and chop the onion
3. On a medium heat, add the olive oil then once hot, the onion. Stir for a few mins until tender and browning
4. Add the sliced mushrooms, pasta and homemade pesto, stirring until completely covered
5. Serve with walnuts and seasoning

 

This recipe was created for Tower Green Hamlets by Pauline Cuisine

Mushroom, Kale and Bean Sprout Stir-Fry

Stir Fry’s are really easy to make and as the vegetables cook quickly in a hot wok, it helps to keep as much of the nutrients as possible. Stir Fry’s are also tasty when reheated, so are a great idea if you need a packed lunch the following day. This recipe features a number of veggies that you’ll find in your boxes throughout the winter months.

Time Preparing: 5 mins
Time Cooking: 15 mins
Serves: 2
Difficulty: 1/5
Season: Winter

Ingredients
– 1 Small Pepper
– 1 Small Chilli
– Handful of Kale
– 25g Bean Spouts
– 100g Mushrooms
– 2 Nests of Asiatic Egg Noodles
– 3 tbsp Soya Sauce
– 2 tbsp Sunflower Oil / Sesame Oil
– Handful of toasted Sesame Seeds

Method
1. Wash all of the vegetables, chop kale and slice bean sprouts
2. Slice mushrooms into small chunks
3. Heat oil in a wok on a medium heat
4. Cook the bean sprouts for a few minutes
5.Add the kale and continue to cook for a further 2 minutes
6. Add Mushrooms, chopped pepper and chopped chilli for a further few minutes
7. Cook the eggs noodles as per instructions
8. Add soya sauce, followed by noodles. Stir to coat all veggies, then serve immediately, topped with toasted sesame seeds

 

This recipe was created for Tower Green Hamlets by Pauline Cuisine

Tumeric Basmati Rice and Lentils with Vegetables

This dish based on basmati rice has the value added to use Tumeric which adds colour to the dish and is really good for the health. Indeed, Tumeric is well known as an antioxidant and anti inflammatory, so there is no excuse to not using it.

For making sure that the dish contains all the vitamins and nutriments, lentils need to be added and then adding sesame seeds and chia seeds complete the goodness of the dish. Lentils can be easily remove from the recipe if you don’t like it

Time Preparing: 25 mins
Time Cooking: 20 mins
Serves: 2
Difficulty: 2/5
Season: Winter

Ingredients
– 100g Basmati Rice
– 50g Green Lentils
– 3 Carrots
– 2 Parsnips (or swede)
– 100g Mushrooms
– 60g Red Russian Kale
– 1 Red Onion
– 2tsp Turmeic Powder
– Handful of toasted Sesame Seeds
– Hadful of Chia Seeds
– Aromatic Herbs
– Salt and Pepper for seasoning

Method
1. Soak the lentils for an hour (optional but helps to reduce cooking time)
2. Wash kale, peel and cut parsnips and carrots into small chunks then steam carrots and parsnips for 10 mins
3. Peel and chop the onion
4. Cook the rice as instructed on package and add turmeric to the cooking water
5. Add carrots and lentils into a pan of boiling water for 15mins with veg stock
6. On a medium heat cook red onion with 1tbsp olive oil
7. After a few minutes, add kale to onion and continue to fry for another few minutes
8. Add remaining veg to the pan along with seasoning
9. Serve by layering turmeric rice, lentils and carrots, then veg
10. Sprinkle with roasted sesame seeds, chia seeds and aromatic herbs

 

This recipe was created for Tower Green Hamlets by Pauline Cuisine

Purple Sprouting Broccoli, Leek & Mushroom Pasta Bake

Time Preparing: 20 mins
Time Cooking: 5 mins
Serves: 4
Difficulty: 2/5
Season: Spring

Ingredients
– 250g Dry Pasta
– 2 Leeks
– 200g Mushrooms
– 200g Purple Sprouting Broccoli
– 150g Mature Cheddar, grated
– 1 Mozzarella Ball
– 25g Butter
– 300ml Milk
– 50g Plain Flour
– Olive Oil
– Salt and Pepper for seasoning

Method
1. Start by cooking pasta in a pan of boiling water as per instructions
2. Add the broccoli to the pasta water for the final 5 mins of cooking before draining and setting to the side
3. Meanwhile, heat the oil in a large pan then add the chopped leeks and mushrooms, frying until mushrooms are golden
4. In a separate pan, heat the butter then add the flour, and gradually add the milk, whisking until you have a smooth sauce. Add half of the cheddar and stir until melted
5. Add the pasta, broccoli, leeks, mushrooms, seasoning and sauce into a baking dish, then sprinkle the remaining cheddar and mozzarella on top
6. Grill until the cheese has melted and is crispy

Oh my, sweet potato pie

Next week is national Pie Week. Only in the UK would you have a week dedicated to celebrating the wonder that are pies!

We’ve really done our research on pies this week and have discovered that pies date all the way back to the Roman period. Originally the pastry was used to store the meat, or whatever other filling was inside, similar to how we’d use a pot nowadays. The pastry, which was fairly inedible back then, would be used to hold the meal together whilst it was cooked. It was only over time that the pastry could be included in the meal too.

Below is a great pie recipe that incorporates many of the ingredients from this weeks boxes:

Chicken, leek and mushroom pie with cauliflower mash topping

Ingredients

For the pie filling:
1 tsp ghee
2 leeks, trimmed, sliced
2 large celery stalks, trimmed, diced
1 bay leaf
500ml hot chicken stock
4 carrots, sliced
1 small fennel bulb, outer leaves removed
250g mushrooms, sliced
600g cooked chicken
large handful chopped parsley
salt and pepper
For the pie topping:
1.2kg cauliflower, outer leaves removed
4 garlic cloves, peeled and left whole
50g butter
salt and pepper

Method
1. Preheat the oven to 220C/200C Fan/Gas 7.
2. Heat the ghee in a frying pan over a medium heat. Add the leeks and fry for 4-5 minutes, or until softened but not browned. Add the celery and bay leaf and increase the heat to high. Fry for 1-2 minutes.
3. Add the chicken stock to the pan and bring to the boil, then add the carrots, fennel and mushrooms and reduce the heat until the mixture is simmering. Continue to simmer the mixture until the volume of liquid has reduced and thickened, and the vegetables are tender, about 12-15 minutes.
4. Meanwhile, for the topping, put the cauliflower, garlic cloves and half of the butter in a large, lidded saucepan. Add 4 tablespoons of water and cover.
5. Bring the pan contents to a simmer over a medium heat and steam for 6-8 minutes, or until the cauliflower is tender when pierced with a knife (add a splash more water during cooking if necessary). Remove from the heat and transfer the contents to a food processor. Blend to your consistency of choice – either smooth and creamy or roughly textured. Season with salt and pepper.
6. To finish the pie filling, remove the bay leaf and add the remaining filling ingredients to the pan. Season with salt and pepper. Stir well, then transfer the mixture to an ovenproof pie dish.
7. Spoon the pie topping over the filling and spread into an even layer using a palette knife. Use a fork to create a criss-cross pattern on top of the filling. Dot the top of the pie with the remaining butter.
8. Bake for 25-30 minutes, or until the filling is bubbling and the topping is golden-brown.

For more ideas on how to eat the vegetables in this week’s box, try searching on our webpage for past blogs!


This Week’s Bounty

All Boxes
Potatoes, Lancs
Cauliflower, Lancs
Flower Sprouts, Lincs
Kale, Perry Court
Winter Pulsane, Perry Court
Leeks, Cambs

Medium & Large Boxes
Mushrooms, Suffolk
Wild Garlic, Kent
Kohl Rabi, Lancs

Large Boxes
Beetroot, Lancs



Fruit Supplement
Apples, Kent (All Boxes)
Pears, Kent (Medium & Large Boxes)
Blood Oranges, ESP (Large Boxes)

Mind the Hungry Gap!

Is this more mumbo-jumbo following our wartime themed newsletter last week? Uhm no. We mean the Hunger Gap is nearly here.

In cultivation of vegetables in a British-type climate, the hungry gap is the gardeners’ name for the period in spring when there is little or no fresh produce is available to harvest. It usually starts when overwintered brassica vegetables such as sprouts, cauliflower and Jan King cabbages “bolt” (i.e. run up to flower) as the days get warmer and longer, and ends when the new season’s first broad beans are ready.

So Perry Court and other local producers are experiencing the usual reduction in harvest for this time of year as wintering crops recede and the array of wildlife can’t resist taking a share as resources dwindle. It just means more of what goes into our veg boxes will be coming from further afield, and going to the Continent more than we might usually do.

But on Perry Court farm-side there has been a fair amount of planting occurring since starting just over two weeks ago, and in the photos below you’re getting a view of the ‘summer’ crops to come. You can see the start of chards, kales and peppers, which have sprouted with good speed! A few other crops than can benefit from early planting have also been sown, and we all eagerly watch as nature wakes up.

So whilst we wait we’ll be writing about our (Spanish) chard which we written about for a long time. Here are some options:

For the rest of the vegetables in this week’s box, try searching on our webpage for past blogs!

This Week’s Bounty

Standard Box
* Valour Potatoes, UK
* Onions, Norfolk
* Carrots, Lancs
* Swiss Chard, Spain
* Celeriac, Lincs
Swedes, Lancs
Spring Greens, Lancs
White Mushrooms, Suffolk
Small Box
Items starred (*) above

No-Potato Substitute
Confection Squash, Cambs

Fruit Supplement
Oranges, Spain (small)
Blood Oranges, Spain (standard)
Apples, Kent (standard)